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Archive for March, 2010

Bye, Bye, Bluefin Tuna (or Maguro a-go-go)

abt Bye, Bye, Bluefin Tuna (or Maguro a go go)

With Bluefin tuna stocks at what seem to be a critical point, Japan, with the help of Canada and a few other countries, has decided to reject a ban on Atlantic Bluefin Tuna fishing, which means that maguro may become a thing of the past. As stocks are down about 80% since the 1970s, and not allowing the stock to replenish could very well be the death knell for the Atlantic Bluefin Tuna.

Japan (and other countries) had been demanding that they would only recognize the sanctions of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) when it came to regulating international fisheries, rather than the United Nations. This meant that the impetus to ban trade in Atlantic Bluefin Tuna, organized by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), was rejected. While ICCAT has been the body which has set fishing quotas for the fish, it has for years set quotas well above what it’s scientists say are sustainable levels. It has therefore been viewed in many circles as largely ineffective at regulating stocks.

A press release from CITES offered a brief summary of what happened:
“Japan, Canada and several members States of the Arab league opposed the proposal arguing that regional fisheries management organizations (RFMOs) as ICCAT [the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas] were best placed to tackle the decline of bluefin tuna stocks. They added that an Appendix I listing [which would ban trade in the species] would not stop the fishing of the species. After a passionate but relatively short debate, the representative of Libya requested to close the deliberations and go for a vote. Iceland called for a secret ballot. The amendment introduced by the European Union and Monaco’s proposal were defeated (20 votes in favor, 68 against, 30 abstentions) in the middle of much confusion about the voting procedures and mixed feelings of satisfaction and frustration from participants.”

Apparently there was not much debate before a vote was called, which ensured a quick resolution based on preconceived decisions.

While the hiatus from Atlantic Bluefin Tuna fishing still remains in effect, after this vote, fishing will resume again in May. We will have to wait and see what happens to Atlantic Bluefin Tuna stocks as fishing continues at these levels. There may be a day soon when maguro disappears from the menu. Only when this happens, it will be too late to save these fish.

Meshi Agare,
Warren
Sushi Otaku

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A Whale of a Problem

As if the serving of endangered Bluefin Tuna were not enough, a Santa Monica, California restaurant called “The Hump” is alleged to have been serving whale as part of its omakase menu, according to the New York Times. They indicate activists surreptitiously filmed themselves being served what was tested to be Sei Whale, an endangered whale still fished in Japan and sold as “Kujira.” Serving marine mammals is illegal in the US, however the Japanese still fish and serve whale under the auspices of “scientific research.” In the US, however, this is a big no-no. There is no word as to what will happen if this is indeed true, however the law suggests up to a year in jail and a $20,000 fine for selling the flesh of marine mammals. Oops?


Whale offered at the Tsukiji fish market in Japan

Warren
Sushi Otaku

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Sushi In Space

From sea to land to space, a fish will travel far to become sushi. Last week, the first hand rolled sushi in space was accomplished by Soichi Noguchi, of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Donning a chef’s hat, Soichi pressed a floating ball of rice onto a small sheet of nori, added a piece of salmon, and entered the record books as the first itamae (sushi chef) aboard the International Space Station. Now I have yet another reason for wanting to visit the ISS.

Warren
Sushi Otaku

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